Acupuncture

Acupuncture & Flow

Acupuncture & Flow

As a Chinese Medicine practitioner I often find myself speaking of flow.  We try to find words to explain as best as possible what we know to be true in our experience, and for me the way to healing ultimately is to be in flow.  What exactly does that mean?

Our Body's Climate

Our Body's Climate

One may observe that when the weather becomes excessively moist, dry, hot, windy, or cold that they suddenly feel their joints ache or a headache come on.  While one person may find their asthma gets worse in dry weather, another person's asthma disappears completely in response to dry weather.

Acupuncture: An Antidote for Stress

Acupuncture: An Antidote for Stress

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the energy that is behind the body’s life force function is called ‘qi’.  Unlike modern medicine, TCM perceives the body’s organs as having different roles in regards to the body’s qi (among many other aspects).  Chinese medical theory considers the liver to be the organ in charge of the qi flowing correctly in the body.  When someone undergoes stress or extreme emotions, it causes the energy or ‘qi’ to contract.  This has a secondary effect of stopping the natural flow of qi - which the liver is in charge of.  The qi then either becomes stuck or begins to move in the opposite direction, which affects the body’s normal function.  The symptoms that can arise from this are pain, irritability, insomnia, abnormal menses, headaches, and abdominal discomfort among many more.

Chinese Organs do what?!?

Chinese Organs do what?!?

If you have ever had an acupuncture treatment you may have heard the following:  ‘Chinese liver moves your qi’ or ‘Chinese kidney affects your fear’.  Chinese liver who?  If you have grown up in any country outside of Asia, chances are that human organs mean something completely different to you.